Category Archives: Defense

Grace Murray Hopper USNR, David and Goliath, Selected computer articles 78, Department of Defense computer institute

Grace Murray Hopper USNR, David and Goliath, Selected computer articles 78, Department of Defense computer institute

“People are not ‘well-behaved’ mathematical functions.”…Grace Murray Hopper, “David and Goliath”

“It is insufficient to plan on the past alone; the plan must be examined in the light of ‘all possible future developments.'”…Grace Murray Hopper, “David and Goliath”

 

I have a book given to me by Admiral Grace Murray Hopper. She was a Captain when I met her. During the 1979-80 academic year I escorted her to a speech she gave at the small college in NC where I taught Computer Science. I had the great fortune and honor to have over an hour of one on one time conversing with her.

I have not decided what to do with the book. I could only find one reference to it on the internet. There is a copy in the Jimmy Carter Library.

Even though Ms Hopper is often quoted from her article, I could find no reference to it on the internet. Duty called and I subsequently typed in the article and it is now available to read.

David and Goliath

By Captain Grace Murray Hopper, USNR

From “Computers in the Navy” 1976.

Included in “Selected Computer Articles 78”, Department of Defense Computer Institute

“Captain Grace Murray Hopper, USNR, graduated from Vassar College and received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University. She entered the Naval Reserve in 1943 under the V-9 program. Completing Midshipman School, she was commissioned a lieutenant (junior grade) and reported to the Bureau of Ordnance Computation Project at Harvard which was then operating the Mark I computer and designing the Mark II. Released to inactive duty in 1946, she joined Sperry UNIVAC as a senior mathematician, advanced to staff scientist, and was retired, in absentia, in 1971. Capt. Hopper was placed on the Naval Reserve Retired list on 31 December 1966 with the rank of commander and recalled to active duty 1 August 1967. She is presently serving in the Information Management Division (Op-91) of OPNAV. Capt. Hopper is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and of sigma Xi, a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Distinguished Fellow of the British Computer Society and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. She has received many awards for work in computer software including the Harry Goode Memorial Award from the American Association of Information Processing Societies and the Wilbur Lucious Cross Medal from Yale. She has received honorary doctorates in science from Long Island University, in engineering from the New Jersey College of Engineering and of laws from the University of Pennsylvania. At the request of the Department of the Navy, she was promoted by an Act of Congress in 1973 to Captain on the Naval Reserve Retired List.

Introduction

Early in the 1950’s, a Naval War College correspondence course included a task which, in part, and paraphrased, read:
1. Make a plan to take an island.
2. Review the plan in the light of all possible enemy actions.
3. Examine the cost of failure to execute the plan.

This technique must be applied to all plans for the use of computer equipment. It is insufficient to plan on the past alone; the plan must be examined in the light of “all possible future developments.” Further, the lost-opportunity cost of omitting the plan or any part of the plan must be evaluated against the cost of implementing the plan. In a practical sense, we examine feasible alternatives and future developments that we can foresee.

The examination of future possibilities is dictated by factors endemic in the computer world: the acceleration of change in hardware developments, the exponential increase in the complexity of application systems, the changing ratio of software against hardware costs and the steadily increasing demand for information–processed data for management decision-making. All of these are pressured by an increasingly complex and interdependent world with its growing population, greater demand for supplies of food and goods, recurring shortages and unpredictable economic and political events. More rapid decisions require fast acquisition of more data and more timely interrelation and reporting of the derived information.

One of Parkinson’s laws says in effect that the growth of a system increases its complexity and that this increase of complexity leads ultimately to confusion and chaos. Even before this final stage is reached, however, facilities can be so overloaded that a small breakdown anywhere in the system produces a close to catastrophic result.

The proper preventative measure is to divide the system into subsystems, each module being as nearly independent as possible. When an enterprise created and directed by a single man grows beyond his ability to manage alone, he will divide it into divisions and sections and appoint vice-presidents to manage them. No engineer would attempt to design a missile alone; rather he will identify sections–nosecone with payload, guidance system, fuel section, motor–and the interfaces between them. Each section is then contracted to a specialist in that category. To divide the work properly, he must have a clear understanding of the how and why of each subdivision’s contribution to the whole.

The Problem

The application of systems has been successful in scientific and technical applications and to some extent in business situations. It meets difficulty when it is applied in social and political situations largely because people are not “well-behaved” mathematical functions, but can only be represented by statistical approximations, and all of the extremes can and do occur.

Entire books have been and will be written on the application of systems concepts to the development, transmission and use of information by computers. It is clear that as the quantity of information grows, so also does the complexity of its structure, the difficulty of selecting the information pertinent to a particular decision, and the amount of “noise” infiltrating the information. A flow is smooth and clear so long as the quantity of flow matches the size of the conduit. If the flow is increased or the conduit roughened, turbulence and confusion or “noise” appear.

Yet, information in large quantities must flow smoothly to decision makers if large systems are to be managed efficiently. Computers can process, control and direct this flow of information, but the speed and capacity of a single computer are limited by physical factors such as the velocity of electronic and optical circuits and the ability to dissipate heat, by cost of hardware and software, and by the ability of human beings to construct error-free, monolithic systems. Only by paralleling processors can the physical limits be overcome. The division of systems into subsystems also provides an answer to the complexity and cost of software as well as reducing error potentials. Fortunately, the rapid reduction in the cost of hardware, occurring simultaneously with an increase in the power of hardware, makes modular systems possible in the present–and practical in the near future.

Parrelleling of peripheral operations with central processor operations using multiprogramming techniques is common practice. Computer systems encompassing co-equal multiprocessors are also available. But, both types of systems are monolithic. The first is controlled by the single central processor and the second by a single executive (operating system). Hence, to cope with more information, processor and executive alike can only grow larger, faster, more complex, more subject to the increase of turbulance and noise and more demanding of controls and housekeeping to maintain the information flow. The system begins to resemble a dinosaur with a large, unwieldy load on his back. At some point an added requirement, like the proverbial last straw, will cause a collapse.

Thus at some point in the life of any system it becomes too large to be sustained by a single control. Tasks must be divided, subsystems defined and responsibilities delegated. Two elements were necesary before the concept of “systems of computers” could become a reality–switching systems and minicomputers.

The Opportunity

Consider a system of computers controlling, for example, an inventory system. At a remote site, A, a transaction is entered on a console called Alpha. The console contains a minicomputer which checks the message and reduces it to a minimal format for transmission using a “telephone number” or an “address” to dial the switching center, Beta, for the inventory minicomputers. Unless all are “busy,” in which case Alpha must try again after a delay, computer Gamma accepts Alpha’s message. Gamma determines that the message indicates the receipt of a particular shipment, B, at a certain warehouse, C; Gamma “dials” Delta, the computer controlling the necessary Master-file entry. Delta locates and transmits the master entry to Gamma who processes the transactions and returns the master entry to Delta for storage. Gamma probably also dials Epsilon with a message to increase the value of the inventory at warehouse C by the amount indicated. Epsilon is a minicomputer controlling a mini-database. Each element of the system contains, and is controlled by, its own minicomputer. Thus, input is processed before it is transmitted to the working-processing computers. The librarian minicomputer, Delta, will control the storage, withdrawal and updating of programs and will deliver a program to other minicomputerss in the system upon request.

Al of the computers in such a system operate asynchronously and can be replaced at will–with a few spares on hand, the system cannot really go completely down. The system can shrink or grow since units can be added or interchanged. Functions of an operating system are either eliminated or distributed. “Busy signals” limit access to a particular file controller to one mini at a time. Data security can be ensured by the file controllers which can reject requests or transmissions unless properly identified.

Savings in software costs can be considerable. Programs are short, modular and easily debuggable. Compilers break up into input compilers, processing compilers, computer compilers, editing compilers and output compilers. The difficulties encountered in debugging large, complex, interactive software systems are reduced to the lesser difficulties of debugging the component subsystems. Very large computational problems might require an assembly line of minicomputers, manufacturing results just as automobiles are manufactured.

Having cut back on overhead by breaking up the hardware and software into subassemblies and linking them by communications, we must now consider the effect on management information. Since computers were first installed to handle basic record-keeping, most systems operate by first updating basic records. Later, reports are accumulated from the basic record files. Taking a simple example, when a life insurance policy is sold, a record of all the facts about the insured is transmitted to a master file, including name, address, beneficiary, social security number, type of policy, amount, salesman, selling office and region. The insurance company marketing manager is not concerned with the facts about the beneficiary, but only the type of policy, amount and where sold. Hence, a mini-data-base can be maintained on-line for the local manager’s use, in which are stored current totals, such as total sales by salesman, by type and by area for this week or month, as well as last month, last year or any selected comparison bases. Another mini-data-base can be maintained for national headquarters. However, here the totals would be by office or by region rather than by individual salesman. For any basic record file, those quantities which can be totaled are collected. Management will be concerned with such totals and their comparisons and relationships. The mini-data-bases at each level will hold but a fraction of the raw data stored in the basic record files. Alternatively, a system of minicomputers can collect management totals as soon as a transaction enters a system, possibly even on-line, and update the basic files later, possibly in batches.

New concepts such as “systems of computers” and “mini-data-bases” will have to be employed to meet the challenging problems of the future. If such concepts are so obviously needed, why do the dinosaurs continue to proliferate? Three factors tend to retard the development of the new methods I have described: human allergy to change, economic arguments against disposing of existing hardware and software instantly, and the dearth of systems analysts trained in the new systems architecture.

An examination of coming developments should impel the creation of the dispersed systems. But visions of the future collide with the reluctance to alter old ways. Even in a world of accelerating change, it is still difficult to convince people that new ways of doing things can be better and cheaper.

Introduction of the new systems must proceed gradually–maybe helped along by a little persuasion, a catch phrase oe two (“don’t get a bigger computer, get another computer”). If an existing system is nearing saturation, it’s load can be eased by a front-end computer for validating and editing (which will later move to the data source). A back-end computer can guard and control the data base (and later become the data manager providing access to a system of computers serving the files and segments of files). Wholesale replacement is not required; rather the change may be made step by step as the potential of the new system becomes obvious.

In areas where hardware plays a larger role, such as industrial operations, the microcomputers will appear within the sensors on the equipment. They will communicate with concentrators making local decisions. Concentrators will forward processed and condensed information to local directing computers for action. Messages forwarded to and from the management data base will report production and receive instructions for alteration of a mix to be forwarded to controlling minicomputers. Only through such a system of computers operating in parallel will it be possible to provide the speed essential to the control of critical operations.

The Challenge

Thus, there is a challenge, a challenge to bring down the myth of the monolithic, expensive, powerful computer and replace it with a more powerful, more economical, more reliable and, above all, more manageable system of computers. A world concerned with more complex problems will require a quantum jump in information processing to meet management requirements. The computers can assist, but only insofar as they are recognized as sophisticated tools and as they are reformed and organized to meet specific needs for processed data.

The need for standards will become clear as communications among the components of such a system grow. Data elements, communications protocols, high level languages and more–all must be defined, standardized and conformance insured if large and flexible systems are to prove viable and costs are to be held to acceptable levels.

One concept must always govern planning–that it consider the future. Ignoring the future results in inadequate, outmoded systems continually in need of costly change and updating, and never quite in tune with the work requirements. Concomitantly, no innovation or standard should be rejected as too costly without careful evaluation of the “cost of not doing it.”

http://recycleuses.com/2018/01/08/grace-murray-hopper-usnr-david-and-goliath-selected-computer-articles-78-department-of-defense-computer-institute-recycled-book-article-and-words/

My encounter:

http://recycleuses.com/2018/01/08/admiral-grace-hopper-my-encounter-escorting-her-to-college-speech-classic-hopper-speech-using-wire-to-reveal-nanosecond-electrical-travel-book-she-sent/

More on Admiral Grace Murray Hopper:

https://news.yale.edu/2017/02/10/grace-murray-hopper-1906-1992-legacy-innovation-and-service

 

 

More here:

https://citizenwells.com/

http://citizenwells.net/

 

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Russia biggest winner in US Iran deal?, Russian Iranian January 20, 2015 military cooperation agreement, Russia lost $13 billion in arms contracts because of sanctions, Iran was the fourth largest importer of Russian military equipment

Russia biggest winner in US Iran deal?, Russian Iranian January 20, 2015 military cooperation agreement, Russia lost $13 billion in arms contracts because of sanctions, Iran was the fourth largest importer of Russian military equipment

“[During negotiations,] the importance of the need to develop Russia and Iran’s cooperation in the joint struggle against meddling in the affairs of the region by external forces that are not part of it was framed,”…Iranian Defense Minister Hossein Dehghan

“President Barack Obama telephoned Russian President Vladimir Putin Wednesday to thank the Russian leader for his integral role in reaching nuclear deal with Iran.”…UPI July 16, 2015

“We are being lied to on a scale unimaginable by George Orwell.”…Citizen Wells

 

 

Forget the impact of an influx of Iranian oil on market prices.

The price of oil is artificially low now and will shoot back up eventually.

Russia stands to gain much when sanctions are lifted on Iran as it lost much when they were imposed.

And don’t forget, any of the theoretical new sanctions or punishments that could  be imposed on Iran can be vetoed by Russia.

From The Diplomat January 21, 2015.

“On January 20, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu and his Iranian counterpart, Defense Minister Hossein Dehghan, signed an intergovernmental agreement on “long term and multifaceted” military cooperation in Tehran, Iran. It is the first time in 15 years that a Russian defense minister has visited Iran and underlines the growing military and diplomatic ties between both countries united by their joint opposition to U.S. foreign policy in the Middle Eastern region and beyond.

According to Sputnik News, defense minister Hossein Dehghan is quoted as saying that during bilateral discussions, “the importance of the need to develop Russia and Iran’s cooperation in the joint struggle against meddling in the affairs of the region by external forces that are not part of it was framed.” Dehghan noted that they singled out the U.S. policy that “meddles in the domestic affairs of other countries” as a major reason for the deteriorating security situation in the Middle East and the rest of the world today.

According to the Associated Press, Dehghan furthermore emphasized that, “Iran and Russia are able to confront the expansionist intervention and greed of the United States through cooperation, synergy and activating strategic potential capacities. … As two neighbors, Iran and Russia have common viewpoints toward political, regional and global issues.”

For example, Russia and Iran are both continuing their support of the Assad regime in Syria.”

“Second, full-fledged military cooperation between Iran and Russia can only happen once UN sanctions have been lifted. This largely depends on Tehran’s willingness to reach a mutually acceptable agreement in the P5+1 negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program.  Only then can full-fledged arms sales resume. In October 2011, Russia made its last and so far only public arms sale to Iran in the form of a radar-jamming station. Back in the year 2000, Iran was the fourth largest importer of Russian military equipment placing right after China, India, and the United Arab Emirates, buying 6.1 percent of Russia’s total arms exports. Sputnik News quotes the Center for the Analysis of World Arms Trade in Moscow, which estimated that the Russian defense industry has lost around $13 billion in arms sales due to UN sanctions against Iran.”

http://thediplomat.com/2015/01/russia-and-iran-sign-military-cooperation-agreement/

From the NY Times July 14, 2015.

“Sergey V. Lavrov, the Russian foreign minister, lost no time in talking about the accord on Iran’s nuclear program. He was on television minutes after the deal was clinched, and even before the formal news conference had begun, announcing the landmark agreement to the audience back home and emphasizing the many potential benefits, strategic and economic, that it holds for Russia.

The deal reopens the door for lucrative contracts to expand Iran’s civilian nuclear energy program, which Russia has been looking forward to for years. And it may neutralize a major reason the United States has offered for developing a missile defense system in Europe, a project that President Vladimir V. Putin and other Kremlin officials have said was a threat to Russian security.”

“Mr. Putin himself issued a statement on Tuesday welcoming the deal, underlining Russia’s role and noting that his government would move ahead with its nuclear power agreements and with strengthening bilateral ties.

He described the accord as “important for the implementation of large-scale plans of peaceful nuclear cooperation between Russia and Iran that got support in the documents approved today.”

Russia possesses some of the world’s foremost expertise in atomic energy, and has helped build and operate atomic reactors in Iran for many years. Rosatom, the Russian state nuclear energy company, helped build and expand the Bushehr nuclear plant and already has contracts to build two more reactors there.

Mr. Lavrov said Russia and Iran have “very ambitious plans for the development of Iranian nuclear power.” He also said Russia expected to have a major role in putting the accord with Iran into effect, including two areas specified in the agreement: the shipment of low-enriched uranium from Iran to Russia in exchange for supplies of natural uranium, and the modification of the Fordo enrichment processing plant to produce stable isotopes for medical and industrial purposes instead of bomb fuel.

Beyond the energy sector, Russia expects to make substantial sales of conventional weapons to Iran. In the late stages of negotiations, Mr. Lavrov made a hard, dramatic push for an immediate and complete lifting of an international arms embargo against Iran, apparently helping set the stage for a deal.

In the end, a compromise was reached that will continue the embargo for five to eight years. Still, Mr. Lavrov suggested that Russia stood to benefit even sooner from renewed arms deals with Tehran because exceptions would be allowed under new notification and United Nations approval procedures.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/15/world/europe/russia-quickly-maneuvers-to-capitalize-on-iran-nuclear-deal.html?_r=0

Oh, and by the way…..

From Reuters July 18, 2015.

“Russia’s Putin orders formation of new military reserve force

Russian President Vladimir Putin has ordered the creation of a new reserve armed force as part of steps to improve training and military readiness at a time of international tensions with the West over Ukraine.”

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/07/18/us-russia-putin-military-reserves-idUSKCN0PS0CZ20150718

 

 

 

Iran Deal Could Cause Nuclear Attack on US, Economics Minister Naftali Bennett warning, Bad deal gives Iran exactly what it wanted, Retains most significant parts of its nuclear program

Iran Deal Could Cause Nuclear Attack on US, Economics Minister Naftali Bennett warning, Bad deal gives Iran exactly what it wanted, Retains most significant parts of its nuclear program

“What was agreed last night in Geneva is not a historic agreement, it is a historic mistake,”…Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu

“We awoke this morning to a new reality. A reality in which a bad deal was signed with Iran. A very bad deal,”…Economics Minister Naftali Bennett 

“Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows.”…George Orwell, “1984″

 

I heard Economics Minister Naftali Bennett being interviewed recently. He impresses me as highly intelligent, articulate and reasonable.

From Arutz Sheva 7 November 24, 2013.

“Bennett Warns: Iran Deal Could Cause Nuclear Attack on US”

“In response to breaking news of deal between world powers, nuclear Iran, Bennett issues warning of long-term implications.”

“Economics Minister Naftali Bennett, who has been on a mission in the US over the past few weeks to prevent Sunday’sdeal between Western powers and a nuclear Iran, has released a scathing response to the breaking news.

“We awoke this morning to a new reality. A reality in which a bad deal was signed with Iran. A very bad deal,” Bennett stated on his Facebook page. “This bad deal gives Iran exactly what it wanted: a significant easing of the sanctions while retaining the most significant parts of its nuclear program.”

Bennett emphasized the long-term implications of the deal, stating that “if a nuclear suitcase blows up five years from now in New York or Madrid, it will be because of the deal that was signed this morning.”

The remarks provide a telling rebuttal to claims by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, an alleged moderate, that “Israel is only concerned about its own interests, and it does not think about the interests of the world.””

Read more:

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/174385#.UpNBT8R4z90

 

Blagojevich appeal prosecutor response, November 13, 2013, 169 page plea to reject new trial request, US Court of Appeals Seventh Circuit, Blagojevich prosecution drags on Obama protected

Blagojevich appeal prosecutor response, November 13, 2013, 169 page plea to reject new trial request, US Court of Appeals Seventh Circuit, Blagojevich prosecution drags on Obama protected

“Why did Judge James Zagel allow only 2 percent of the Blagojevich wiretaps to be released?”…Citizen Wells

“I can tell you that, based on court rules and procedures, Judge James Zagel carries some of the blame for the delay in the transcripts.

The question is, what was Judge Zagel’s motivation?”…Citizen Wells

“Regardless of how this plays out, it benefits Obama. If there is no appeal or the appeal is denied, Blagojevich will be sequestered. If the appeal proceeds, it could drag out beyond impacting the 2012 election cycle. The intent is obvious.”…Citizen Wells, July 19, 2011

The prosecution of Blagojevich drags on and protects Obama.

From Fox News Illinois November 13, 2013.

“Prosecutors respond to Blagojevich appeal”
“Prosecutors have filed a response to Rod Blagojevich’s corruption conviction appeal. The 169-page government filing submitted late Tuesday urges the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reject the imprisoned former governor’s request for a new trial. Defense lawyers filed the appeal on the Illinois Democrat’s behalf in July. It asks the Chicago-based appellate court to toss his convictions or at least reduce his 14-year prison sentence.”

Read more:

http://www.foxillinois.com/template/inews_wire/wires.regional.il/26fb71b1-www.foxillinois.com.shtml#.UoN2XPl4z90

From Citizen Wells July 16, 2013.

“Blagojevich appeals convictions, stiff sentence”

“Lawyers for Rod Blagojevich filed an appeal Monday challenging the imprisoned former Illinois governor’s corruption conviction and stiff, 14-year prison term.

The lengthy filing with the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago comes more than two years after the Chicago Democrat’s retrial and 16 months after he entered a federal prison in Colorado.

Jurors convicted Blagojevich, 56, of engaging in wide-ranging corruption, including that the two-term governor sought to profit from his power to appoint someone to the U.S. Senate seat that Barack Obama vacated to become president.

The appeal cites a juror who allegedly expressed a bias against Blagojevich who was seated despite the objections of defense attorneys. It also raises longstanding claims that Judge James Zagel barred FBI wiretap evidence that might have aided the defense and argues the judge miscalculated the appropriate prison term.

The appeal was filed about 30 minutes before a midnight deadline to do so.

In June, Blagojevich’s attorneys requested permission to file a longer-than-usual appeal, noting the trial produced 12,000 pages of transcripts. “The issues for appeal are numerous and complicated,” they wrote. The court agreed to let them file the equivalent of about 100 pages, which is what they did.

Blagojevich was convicted on 18 counts over two trials, jurors in the first deadlocking on all but one count. Taking the stand in the second, decisive trial in 2011, Blagojevich insisted his talking about wanting to sell Obama’s seat was just that — talk.

At his sentencing hearing later in 2011, an uncharacteristically deferential Blagojevich asked Zagel for mercy and said he accepted responsibility. He told the court in a hushed voice, “I caused it all.”

Despite those words, Zagel imposed a lengthy prison term, telling Blagojevich he had abused voters’ trust and undermined the democratic process “to do things that were only good for yourself.”

Many observers at the time said Blagojevich’s best hope on appeal wasn’t that a higher court would overturn his convictions but that appellate judges would agree his sentence was too harsh.”

http://www.theoaklandpress.com/articles/2013/07/16/news/doc51e4d91045f9d865437288.txt?viewmode=fullstory

The appeal.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/154180774/Blagojevich-Appeal

The response.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/183864545/Blagojevich-Appeal-Response-Prosecutors-oppose-new-trial

Blagojevich appeal update, One year prison anniversary, Appeal opening brief April 25, 2013, Attorneys Goodman and Kaeseberg, 7th Circuit Court of Appeals

Blagojevich appeal update, One year prison anniversary, Appeal opening brief April 25, 2013, Attorneys Goodman and Kaeseberg, 7th Circuit Court of Appeals

“Why wasn’t Rod Blagojevich, Governor of IL, prosecuted before Tony Rezko, a businessman?”…Citizen Wells

“Why did Colin Powell allow Patrick Fitzgerald to be pulled away from the Blagojevich prosecution?”…Citizen Wells

“Why wasn’t Rod Blagojevich, the Governor of Illinois, wiretapped at least by 2005 when it was known in 2003 that there was widespread corruption in his administration?”…Citizen Wells

Today, March 15, 2013 is the one year anniversary of Rod Blagojevich’s 14 year prison sentence.

From Politico March 15, 2013.

“A year in prison, Rod Blagojevich in good spirits”
“It’s been a year since Rod Blagojevich entered a federal prison in Colorado to start serving his 14-year sentence for corruption — and his attorney says while the former Illinois governor misses his family, he remains in “good spirits” and is “hopeful” the conviction will be overturned.

Blagojevich’s appellate lawyer Len Goodman — who, along with attorney Lauren Kaeseberg, is working on the appeal — told POLITICO that Blagojevich’s family visits him “as often as they can make the trip” to Englewood, a low-security facility in Littleton, Colo.”

“And next up for the former governor, Goodman said, is his case on appeal in the 7th Circuit. Blagojevich’s opening brief is due April 25, Goodman noted.

“He is hopeful that his appeal will be successful and that his conviction will be overturned,” Goodman wrote.”

“Goodman, meanwhile, said he is currently busy working his way through thousands of pages of trial transcript as he works on Blagojevich’s appeal.”

Read more:

http://www.politico.com/story/2013/03/rod-blagojevich-jail-88904.html?hp=r6

Still wondering what Obama and Blagojevich were discussing shortly before Blagojevich was arrested in 2008.

ObamaBlagoNov2008

And…..

“Why wasn’t Rod Blagojevich, the Governor of Illinois, wiretapped at least by 2005 when it was known in 2003 that there was widespread corruption in his administration?”

Rand Paul announcement March 5, 2013, Glenn Beck states big, Paul Illinois GOP dinner, Obama Administration use of attack drones, US citizen surveilance, Paul 2016 presidential bid

Rand Paul announcement March 5, 2013, Glenn Beck states big, Paul Illinois GOP dinner, Obama Administration use of attack drones, US citizen surveilance, Paul 2016 presidential bid
“In the Department’s view, a lethal operation conducted against a U.S. citizen whose conduct poses an imminent threat of violent attack against the United States would be a legitimate act of national self-defense that would not violate the assassination ban. Similarly, the use of lethal force, consistent with the laws of war, against an individual who is a legitimate military target would be lawful and would not violate the assassination ban.”…Obama DOJ Memo

“I just want you to know that we are working on it (gun control)….We have to go through a few processes, but under the radar.”…Barack Obama

“Germans who wish to use firearms should join the SS or the SA – ordinary citizens don’t need guns, as their having guns doesn’t serve the State.”…Heinrich Himmler

A few minutes ago Glenn Beck stated that Rand Paul would make a very big announcement on The Blaze today. Many are speculating that it has something to do with Obama’s use of drones to spy on US citizens.

From Illinois Review March 5, 2013.

“If Republicans in Illinois are beaten down and discouraged, they didn’t show it at last night’s Northwest Suburban Republican Lincoln Day Dinner where more than 650 people came out to hear U.S. Senator Rand Paul.

Ryan Higgins, the Republican Committeeman for Schaumburg Township, attributed the success of the dinner to high enthusiasm among party regulars as well as an influx of new members.”

“”We meet three times a week with the Republican caucus,” Paul said. “With the group now down to 45, we’ve gotten to know each other pretty well and sometimes it’s an echo chamber. If you say, ‘I’m for the Second Amendment,’ you get slapped on the back and everybody loves you. But you go down the list, and it’s not always such a consensus. Once you get to the Fourth Amendment, you’re not getting everybody.”

“You may not realize this, but they gave up on the Fourth Amendment when they stopped issuing warrants before examining your bank records,” Paul said. “I don’t know about you, but everything’s on my Visa card. You can tell if I go to a doctor, you can tell if I drink, if I gamble. For goodness sake, shouldn’t you have to issue a warrant before you look at my Visa bill?””
“”I hate terrorists as much as anyone, and they should be killed on the battlefield,” Paul said. “But we can’t let drones fly around threatening U.S. citizens. What you need to understand in this controversy over drones is we’re not talking about someone with a grenade launcher on their shoulder. Some of these people being killed by drones are in their house or in a cafeteria.

“I’ve said a lot of bad things about the government,” Paul said. I don’t want them coming to my house with a drone.” Paul said, emphasizing the Obama Administration’s plan to use drones, even within America boundaries, is vague and without geographic boundaries.

“Can’t we have a little more assurance from the president that he won’t attack American citizens without a trial?”

Privacy issues, drones, prisoner rights are all a part of the discussions that have come up in recent U.S. Senate hearings, he said, from the nomination for Intelligence Chief Brennan to the Benghazi incident and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Paul told the audience Secretary Clinton should have resigned immediately after Libyan Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three others were killed in Benghazi.”

“Paul is considering a bid for the White House in 2016, and he met privately with local Republican donors such as Jack Roeser and Bruce Rauner before dinner.”

http://illinoisreview.typepad.com/illinoisreview/2013/03/paul-in-palatine.html

Colorado Democrat legislators gun statements, Dumb and dumber, Ballpoint pens against shooter, Call boxes and safe zones protect against rape at colleges

Colorado Democrat legislators gun statements, Dumb and dumber, Ballpoint pens against shooter, Call boxes and safe zones protect against rape at colleges

“Weaker people, whether at school, at home or elsewhere are best protected from stronger people, with ill intent, by guns and proper security measures.”…Citizen Wells

“Germans who wish to use firearms should join the SS or the SA – ordinary citizens don’t need guns, as their having guns doesn’t serve the State.”…Heinrich Himmler

“The very atmosphere of firearms anywhere and everywhere restrains evil interference – they deserve a place of honor with all that’s good”…George Washington

 

Colorado legislators.

Dumb and dumber reality stars.

From Michelle Morin February 19, 2013.

“CO Democrat Lawmaker – Protect Yourself From a Shooter with Ballpoint Pens”

“While justifying the coming obliteration of your Second Amendment right, Colorado State Senator Jesse Ulibarri (D) shared an empowering, proven idea on how you can defend yourself from a shooter, and you don’t even need a gun to do it. Instead, use a ballpoint pen.

Yes, he really said it:

“When Congressman Giffords was shot … people who were unarmed took that person down when he stopped to reload. And so there are other ways to address violence …. very valiant folks stood up to defend themselves and protect themselves, and they did it with ballpoint pens.” ~ Colorado State Senator Jesse Ulibarri (D)””

http://www.mom4freedom.com/tag/colorado-legislature/

From Breitbart February 19, 2013.

“A Colorado legislator stated Monday that women in college should not carry guns to protect themselves from sexual assault, because they may prematurely shoot harmless men they “feel” are dangerous.

During a debate on gun control in the Colorado legislature, a bill HB13-1226, was presented to eliminate legal concealed carry on college campuses by permit holders. Rep. Joe Salazar (D-Thornton) decided that women should be denied the right to carry their legal guns because even if they felt they were going to be raped, they had call boxes and safe zones to protect them. Salazar asserted:

There are some gender inequities on college campuses. This is true. And universities have been faced with that situation for a long time. It’s why we have call boxes, that’s why we have safe zones, that’s why we have the whistles because you just don’t know who you’re going to be shootin’ at.  And you don’t know if you feel like you’re going to be raped, or if you feel like someone’s been following you around, or if you feel like you’re in trouble and when you may actually not be, that you pop out that gun and you pop around at somebody.”

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2013/02/19/Colorado-Legislator-Going-To-Be-Raped-Use-A-Call-Box-Not-A-Gun

“You can’t fix stupid.”…Ron White