Tag Archives: One size doesn’t fit all

NC common core, Why North Carolina should get away from Common Core, Lieutenant Governor Dan Forest, Local control important, One size doesn’t fit all, Common core not vetted and tested and costly

NC common core, Why North Carolina should get away from Common Core, Lieutenant Governor Dan Forest, Local control important, One size doesn’t fit all, Common core not vetted and tested and costly

“…and Socialist governments traditionally do make a financial mess. They [socialists] always run out of other people’s money. It’s quite a characteristic of them.”…Margaret Thatcher

 
“When an opponent declares, “I will not come over to your side,” I calmly say, “Your child belongs to us already… What are you? You will pass on. Your descendants, however, now stand in the new camp. In a short time they will know nothing else but this new community.”…Adolf Hitler 

“We control life, Winston, at all its levels. You are imagining that there is something called human nature which will be outraged by what we do and will turn against us. But we create human nature. Men are infinitely malleable.”…George Orwell, “1984″

 

 

From the Greensboro News and Record April 13, 2014.

“Why North Carolina should get away from Common Core

By Dan Forest

North Carolina should have the highest education standards in the world, but we can do better than Common Core.

Four years after Common Core was adopted by the State Board of Education, many students, parents and educators are getting their first glimpse of the implications of the new standards in the classroom. Yet after months of questions about the challenges of the standards from parents and educators, few answers have been revealed. Here is why we can to better than Common Core:

1. Local control of education is a bedrock of our nation. Parents, teachers and school boards should have ultimate control and authority over the education of their children. Common Core is a copyrighted set of standards, designed by two unaccountable national trade associations and pushed by the federal government through Race To The Top grants ($400 million in North Carolina) for states that adopted the standards. These standards cannot be changed or modified by state or local authorities. The argument is that we can add to them; however, the reality is that we cannot change anything written in them. Common Core is inflexible in meeting the demands of rapid change that is occurring around the world.

2. A One-Size-Fits-All set of standards for all of education in America is un-American. America is a nation of diversity and innovation. Each student is unique, and for the first time in the history of the world, through high-speed broadband technology and one-to-one devices in the hands of every student, we have the opportunity to customize curriculum and the education experience to each and every child. Our 50 states should be recognized for the innovation laboratories that they are, and they should be allowed to innovate in education, constantly improving standards and teaching methodologies in order to share their ideas with other states. A one-size-fits-all set of standards restricts that level of innovation.

3. Why would we settle for anything less than the best standards for North Carolina? Massachusetts had the best math standards in America, so why did we not start by adopting its standards for our students? Massachusetts educators improved their standards over decades, and they had been tried, tested, rewritten and aligned with working assessments. The Common Core standards still have not been tried, tested or rewritten for success four years after adoption in North Carolina. Why would we roll out Common Core to every school and every student in our state, all at once, without proper vetting and testing?

4. Common Core does not prepare our students for STEM education or careers.The promise of Common Core was that it was to be rigorous, internationally benchmarked, and it would prepare our students for college and career. Unfortunately, experts admit that rigor is difficult to define; the standards were never internationally benchmarked, and there is much debate as to Common Core college alignment. Experts have noted that the Common Core math sequence does not prepare our students for a rigorous STEM education in the university, nor does it prepare our students for STEM careers.
Why would the Chamber of Commerce, the conservative Fordham Institute, the Gates Foundation and others support Common Core despite its inability to prepare our students for STEM careers? Because there are significant financial interests for each. Experts have also noted that replacing classic literature with informational text, such as Consumer Reports, does not help our students develop better critical-thinking skills or reading skills.

5. Teachers need to be free to teach. Common Core is just another set of bureaucratic mandates that will force teachers to teach to the test. There has been much frustration from the teaching community regarding this aspect of No Child Left Behind, so the federal government created waivers from NCLB only to replace it with more burdensome guidelines that will take creativity and innovation out of the classroom. If we want innovation in education, we should focus less on standards and more on allowing our teachers to do what they do best — teach.

These are just a few reasons why Common Core should be replaced in North Carolina, not mentioning the high cost of implementation at a time when we need to increase teacher pay. Nor did I mention technology readiness for the standards, or even data collection of student information. It is time to replace Common Core with the best standards in the world — North Carolina standards.”

Read more:

http://www.news-record.com/opinion/columns/article_ef0badac-c0f0-11e3-b83a-001a4bcf6878.html

 

Obamacare will piss off employees used to choices, Businesses could shun Obamacare exchanges, Single plan bad for elderly and young, One size doesn’t fit all

Obamacare will piss off employees used to choices, Businesses could shun Obamacare exchanges, Single plan bad for elderly and young, One size doesn’t fit all

“If you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan.”…Barack Obama

“The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)[1] imposes numerous tax hikes that transfer more than $500 billion over 10 years—and more in the future—from hardworking American families and businesses to Congress for spending on new entitlements and subsidies. In addition, higher tax rates on working and investing will discourage economic growth both now and in the future, further lowering the standard of living.”…Heritage Foundation

“Can we stop calling ObamaCare the Affordable Care Act now?”…Guilford College student

One size doesn’t fit all. Another reason to keep government out of health care and our lives.

From CNN money April 4, 2013.
“Businesses could shun Obamacare exchanges”

“By 2014, two kinds of health exchanges are scheduled to be up and running: One for individuals and one for small businesses.

Under the Small Business Health Options Program, business owners would choose a level of coverage, and their workers could pick among competing plans that qualify.

Under a new proposal from federal regulators, each business owner would still have their pick of insurance from several providers. But businesses would be limited to choosing a single plan to cover all their employees. An expansion of more options would not come until at least 2015.

Related: What companies need to know about Obamacare

It would limit employers who currently offer several plan options to their employees. That makes up about half of all small businesses, according to health insurance broker Jesse Smedley.

“People who are used to having a choice and offering multiple plans are going to be pissed off,” said Smedley, who owns iHealthBrokers.

That includes business owners like Zachary Davis, who owns two ice cream shops and acafe in Santa Cruz, Calif. He currently provides health insurance to his 20 full-time workers, a diverse group that ranges from college students to seniors.

Davis chose to offer his employees three different types of plans to better suit their needs.

The young ones are fresh out of college and loaded with student debt. They prefer to pay lower monthly premiums and higher out-of-pocket costs, because they’re healthy and rarely see a doctor.

His older workers visit doctors more frequently and opt for higher premiums and lower deductibles.

Davis said limiting each business to a single plan would be a deal breaker, keeping him out of Obamacare exchanges.”

Read more:

http://money.cnn.com/2013/04/04/smallbusiness/obamacare-exchanges/?source=cnn_bin