Tag Archives: George Orwell birthday

Julian Assange (Winston) the thought criminal, George Orwell birthday, Orwell could not have envisioned the level of messenger shooting, The Times “It’s time the UK forced Assange out of hiding”

Julian Assange (Winston) the thought criminal, George Orwell birthday, Orwell could not have envisioned the level of messenger shooting, The Times “It’s time the UK forced Assange out of hiding”

“There is an epidemic of messenger shooting.”…Citizen Wells

“The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command. His heart sank as he thought of the enormous power arrayed against him, the ease with which any Party intellectual would overthrow him in debate, the subtle arguments which he would not be able to understand, much less answer. And yet he was in the right! They were wrong and he was right. The obvious, the silly, and the true had got to be defended. Truisms are true, hold on to that! The solid world exists, its laws do not change. Stones are hard, water is wet, objects unsupported fall towards the earth’s centre. With the feeling that he was speaking to O’Brien, and also that he was setting forth an important axiom, he wrote:

Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows.”…George Orwell, “1984”

“”You’re a traitor!” yelled the boy. “You’re a thought criminal!””…George Orwell, “1984”

 

 

From The Times via the Weekend Australian.

“It’s time the UK forced Assange out of hiding”

“That entirely speculative case is an attempt to play the British government. “I cannot imagine that anyone sensible in the British government wants to have a protracted battle to extradite me to Trump’s America.” Does he imagine this gives him leverage? He does.

The fact is his games have distorted the whole whistleblowing function of Wikileaks over the past years. It went for Hillary Clinton’s email cache, gambling that a grateful President Trump would not pursue him. It leaves Vladimir Putin alone because any country that can shelter Edward Snowden to irritate the US can do the same for Assange. And its founder’s cynical attempts to brush away rape allegations have made some whistleblowers think again about approaching his organisation.

Ecuador too has cooled. The asylum offer was extended by the former president Rafael Correa who was not exactly a champion of free speech. The ambassador to London, Ana Alban, rearranged the life of the embassy to make space for her ungrateful guest. According to Andrew O’Hagan, who was engaged to ghost the Assange memoirs, the fugitive was scathing about his host, describing her as mad, a compulsive dieter who would stalk the embassy corridors at night. Nor was Moreno (“Call me Lenin”) happy when Assange tweeted abuse against an Ecuadorean opposition politician.

So it may have been Britain’s calculation that Ecuador’s patience would crack with Assange. The turnaround in the Swedish case this spring was an opportunity to do just that and so was the presidential election. As one diplomat explained to me: “We thought they might come up with a deal — we buy more of their bananas or whatever, and they tell him to pack his bags.” Similar condescension was on display when Alban approached Hugo Swire, then minister for Latin America, and asked how the two countries could work together “to get rid of the stone in our shoes”. “Not our stone,” Swire reportedly replied, “not our shoe.”

We have been missing the point. Ecuador’s leaders earned praise from fellow leftist governments in Latin America, from the Cubans, the Venezuelans, the Brazilians, the Bolivians. Assange was cocking a snook at the United States, tapping into the anti-Yanqui sentiment; a digital standard bearer of the Bolivarian revolution. Why would they give up that prestige for a bit of extra foreign aid or some leeway on banana imports?

By letting this absurd standoff continue, Britain gives the impression that it doesn’t care enough about holding him to account. There is only one sensible recourse left: threaten Ecuador with the closure of its embassy. When Assange first walked into the embassy in 2012 the government did consider stripping immunity from the offices. This would have been feasible if the diplomats had been offered alternative property, and if there was a national security issue at stake. Ecuador has certainly allowed the premises to be used for purposes contrary to the national interest.

Nothing came of that plan. In the meantime Ecuador’s diplomats have become prisoners of Assange’s paranoia. It is their government’s failure to act that generated this absurd showdown. The surest way of ending it is to break off the diplomatic relationship in its entirety. That’s unpleasant, there will be damage to relations with other South American states and there will be a legal tangle. If the vacated embassy premises were to be managed by a third country acting on behalf of Ecuador’s interests, Assange could try to claim he is still shielded by immunity. But his days would be numbered.

Ecuador has to understand: it is not a friendly act to harbour someone who wants to drive a wedge between Britain and its primary ally. Nor is it a particularly effective humanitarian gesture. If Ecuador cannot summon the political will to surrender Assange, then its diplomats should pack their bags.”

Read more:

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/the-times/its-time-the-uk-forced-assange-out-of-hiding/news-story/2962879e9769cee8ac2f730a59b137cd

 

More here:

https://citizenwells.com/

http://citizenwells.net/

 

Advertisements

George Orwell birthday, Thursday June 25, 2015, Eric Blair, Orwell quotes, He warned us when will people listen, Thank God for the life of George Orwell

George Orwell birthday, Thursday June 25, 2015, Eric Blair, Orwell quotes, He warned us when will people listen, Thank God for the life of George Orwell

“What I have most wanted to do throughout the past ten years is to make political writing into an art,”
“My starting point is always a feeling of partisanship, a sense of injustice. When I sit down to write a book, I do not say to myself, ‘I am going to produce a work of art’. I write it because there is some lie that I want to expose, some fact to which I want to draw attention, and my initial concern is to get a hearing.”…George Orwell essay 1946

“We are being lied to on a scale unimaginable by George Orwell.”…Citizen Wells

 

 

Today, June 25, 2015, is George Orwell’s birthday.

I began quoting Orwell’s “1984” on a regular basis early in 2008 after watching and experiencing the tactics of the Obama camp.

Thank God for the life of Eric Blair, George Orwell.

Here are some of his quotes.

“Big Brother is watching you.”

“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

“Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.”

“In a time of universal deceit – telling the truth is a revolutionary act.”

“We have now sunk to a depth at which restatement of the obvious is the first duty of intelligent men.”

“Early in life I had noticed that no event is ever correctly reported in a newspaper.”

“The very concept of objective truth is fading out of the world. Lies will pass into history.”

“If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”

“Freedom is the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”

“Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows.”

“So much of left-wing thought is a kind of playing with fire by people who don’t even know that fire is hot.”

Read more:

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/g/george_orwell.html

George Orwell birthday, June 25, 2013, Eric Blair, “1984”, Ex spy chief Pacepa, Obama thrives on disinformation, Rewriting history, Manufacturing lies, Deception, False documents

George Orwell birthday, June 25, 2013, Eric Blair, “1984”, Ex spy chief Pacepa, Obama thrives on disinformation, Rewriting history, Manufacturing lies, Deception, False documents

“All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.”…George Orwell, “Animal Farm” 


“And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed
–if all records told the same tale–then the lie passed into
history and became truth. “Who controls the past,” ran the
Party slogan, “controls the future: who controls the present
controls the past.”…George Orwell, “1984″

“History has taught you nothing if you think you can kill ideas. Tyrants have tried to do that before, and the ideas have risen up in their might and destroyed them. You can burn my books and the books of the best minds in Europe, but the ideas in them have seeped through a million channels and will continue to quicken other minds.”…Helen Keller

 

Today, June 25, 2013, is George Orwell, Eric Blair’s, birthday.

Orwell was the author of “1984”, “Animal Farm” and other books and essays.

From Citizen Wells June 25, 2012.

Big Brother is alive and thriving.

From Citizen Wells June 25, 2011.

One of the highest honors I ever received was when the Post & Email placed the photo of George Orwell in the article they did on the Citizen Wells blog on May 25, 2010. I am also honored to present the following on George Orwell and 1984.

From The Complete works of George Orwell.

“Eric Blair was born in 1903 in Motihari, Bengal, in the then British colony of India, where his father, Richard, worked for the Opium Department of the Civil Service. His mother, Ida, brought him to England at the age of one. He did not see his father again until 1907, when Richard visited England for three months before leaving again until 1912. Eric had an older sister named Marjorie and a younger sister named Avril. With his characteristic humour, he would later describe his family’s background as “lower-upper-middle class.” “

“In 1944 Orwell finished his anti-Stalinist allegory Animal Farm, which was published the following year with great critical and popular success. The royalties from Animal Farm provided Orwell with a comfortable income for the first time in his adult life. From 1945 Orwell was the Observer’s war correspondent and later contributed regularly to the Manchester Evening News. He was a close friend of the Observer’s editor/owner, David Astor and his ideas had a strong influence on Astor’s editorial policies. In 1949 his best-known work, the dystopian Nineteen Eighty-Four, was published. He wrote the novel during his stay on the island of Jura, off the coast of Scotland.”

“During most of his career Orwell was best known for his journalism, both in the British press and in books of reportage such as Homage to Catalonia (describing his experiences during the Spanish Civil War), Down and Out in Paris and London (describing a period of poverty in these cities), and The Road to Wigan Pier (which described the living conditions of poor miners in northern England). According to Newsweek, Orwell “was the finest journalist of his day and the foremost architect of the English essay since Hazlitt.”

Contemporary readers are more often introduced to Orwell as a novelist, particularly through his enormously successful titles Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. The former is considered an allegory of the corruption of the socialist ideals of the Russian Revolution by Stalinism, and the latter is Orwell’s prophetic vision of the results of totalitarianism. Orwell denied that Animal Farm was a reference to Stalinism. Orwell had returned from Catalonia a staunch anti-Stalinist and anti-Communist, but he remained to the end a man of the left and, in his own words, a ‘democratic socialist’.

Orwell is also known for his insights about the political implications of the use of language. In the essay “Politics and the English Language”, he decries the effects of cliche, bureaucratic euphemism, and academic jargon on literary styles, and ultimately on thought itself. Orwell’s concern over the power of language to shape reality is also reflected in his invention of Newspeak, the official language of the imaginary country of Oceania in his novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. Newspeak is a variant of English in which vocabulary is strictly limited by government fiat. The goal is to make it increasingly difficult to express ideas that contradict the official line – with the final aim of making it impossible even to conceive such ideas. (cf. Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis). A number of words and phrases that Orwell coined in Nineteen Eighty-Four have entered the standard vocabularly, such as “memory hole,” “Big Brother,” “Room 101,” “doublethink,” “thought police,” and “newspeak.” ”

“We control life, Winston, at all its levels. You are imagining that there is something called human nature which will be outraged by what we do and will turn against us. But we create human nature. Men are infinitely malleable.”

THANK GOD FOR THE LIFE OF GEORGE ORWELL.

Read more:

https://citizenwells.wordpress.com/2012/06/25/george-orwell-birthday-june-25-2012-eric-blair-george-orwell-org-malware-attack-hacker-compromises-orwell-site-big-brother-is-alive/

It is fitting that WND just presented the following:

“EX-SPY CHIEF: OBAMA THRIVES ON ‘DISINFORMATION'”
“The highest-ranking Soviet bloc intelligence official ever to defect to the West, Lt. Gen. Ion Mihai Pacepa is at it again.

A quarter century ago, in his international bestseller “Red Horizons,” Pacepa exposed the massive crimes and corruption of his former boss, Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu, giving the dictator a nervous breakdown and inspiring him to send assassination squads to the U.S. to find his former spy chief and kill him. They failed. On Christmas Day 1989, Ceausescu was executed by his own people at the end of a trial whose accusations came almost word-for-word out of “Red Horizons.”

After courageously defecting to the United States, which he now proudly calls home, Pacepa became a major asset to the Central Intelligence Agency’s efforts to deal with the “evil empire” of the Soviet Union. The CIA has praised Pacepa’s cooperation for providing “an important and unique contribution to the United States,” and President Ronald Reagan (seen below holding Pacepa’s “Red Horizons”) reportedly referred to it as “my bible for dealing with dictators.””
“In “Disinformation,” Pacepa and Rychlak reveal that the Soviet Union’s immense intelligence apparatus, unlike other nations’ spy establishments, was not primarily focused on spying and gathering intel on other nations. Instead, reveal the authors, the communist bloc intelligence services, including the Russian KGB and the Romanian DIE headed by Pacepa, were much more preoccupied with rewriting history, with manufacturing lies, deception and false documents, with turning one religion against another, with defaming the noblest people and glorifying the worst, and – perhaps most importantly – with planting an endless barrage of false, perverse, anti-American disinformation into the liberal Western news media.”
“By its very nature, a disinformation campaign can work only if the seemingly independent Western press accepts intentionally fabricated lies and presents them to the public as truth. Thus, Pacepa and Rychlak also document how the U.S. “mainstream media’s” enduring sympathy for all things liberal-left has made it vulnerable to – indeed, the prime carrier of – civilization-transforming campaigns of lying, defamation and historical revisionism that turn reality on its head.”

Read more:

http://www.wnd.com/2013/06/ex-spy-chief-obama-thrives-on-disinformation/

George Orwell birthday, 1984 author, Animal Farm, Big Brother, Thought police, Newspeak, Orwellian, Mainstream media nemesis

George Orwell birthday, 1984 author, Animal Farm, Big Brother, Thought police, Newspeak, Orwellian, Mainstream media nemesis

“All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.”…George Orwell, “Animal Farm”
“And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed
–if all records told the same tale–then the lie passed into
history and became truth. “Who controls the past,” ran the
Party slogan, “controls the future: who controls the present
controls the past.”…George Orwell, “1984″

Today, June 25, 2011 is George Orwell’s birthday.

One of the highest honors I ever received was when the Post & Email placed the photo of George Orwell in the article they did on the Citizen Wells blog on May 25, 2010. I am also honored to present the following on George Orwell and 1984.

From The Complete works of George Orwell.

“Eric Blair was born in 1903 in Motihari, Bengal, in the then British colony of India, where his father, Richard, worked for the Opium Department of the Civil Service. His mother, Ida, brought him to England at the age of one. He did not see his father again until 1907, when Richard visited England for three months before leaving again until 1912. Eric had an older sister named Marjorie and a younger sister named Avril. With his characteristic humour, he would later describe his family’s background as “lower-upper-middle class.” ”

“In 1944 Orwell finished his anti-Stalinist allegory Animal Farm, which was published the following year with great critical and popular success. The royalties from Animal Farm provided Orwell with a comfortable income for the first time in his adult life. From 1945 Orwell was the Observer’s war correspondent and later contributed regularly to the Manchester Evening News. He was a close friend of the Observer’s editor/owner, David Astor and his ideas had a strong influence on Astor’s editorial policies. In 1949 his best-known work, the dystopian Nineteen Eighty-Four, was published. He wrote the novel during his stay on the island of Jura, off the coast of Scotland.”

“During most of his career Orwell was best known for his journalism, both in the British press and in books of reportage such as Homage to Catalonia (describing his experiences during the Spanish Civil War), Down and Out in Paris and London (describing a period of poverty in these cities), and The Road to Wigan Pier (which described the living conditions of poor miners in northern England). According to Newsweek, Orwell “was the finest journalist of his day and the foremost architect of the English essay since Hazlitt.”

Contemporary readers are more often introduced to Orwell as a novelist, particularly through his enormously successful titles Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. The former is considered an allegory of the corruption of the socialist ideals of the Russian Revolution by Stalinism, and the latter is Orwell’s prophetic vision of the results of totalitarianism. Orwell denied that Animal Farm was a reference to Stalinism. Orwell had returned from Catalonia a staunch anti-Stalinist and anti-Communist, but he remained to the end a man of the left and, in his own words, a ‘democratic socialist’.

Orwell is also known for his insights about the political implications of the use of language. In the essay “Politics and the English Language”, he decries the effects of cliche, bureaucratic euphemism, and academic jargon on literary styles, and ultimately on thought itself. Orwell’s concern over the power of language to shape reality is also reflected in his invention of Newspeak, the official language of the imaginary country of Oceania in his novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. Newspeak is a variant of English in which vocabulary is strictly limited by government fiat. The goal is to make it increasingly difficult to express ideas that contradict the official line – with the final aim of making it impossible even to conceive such ideas. (cf. Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis). A number of words and phrases that Orwell coined in Nineteen Eighty-Four have entered the standard vocabularly, such as “memory hole,” “Big Brother,” “Room 101,” “doublethink,” “thought police,” and “newspeak.” ”

Read more:

http://www.george-orwell.org/l_biography.html

Some of my favorite “1984” quotes.

“And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed
–if all records told the same tale–then the lie passed into
history and became truth. “Who controls the past,” ran the
Party slogan, “controls the future: who controls the present
controls the past.”

“The past, he reflected, had not merely been altered, it had
actually been destroyed. For how could you establish, even
the most obvious fact when there existed no record outside
your own memory?”

“The past is whatever the records and the memories agree upon.
And since the party is in full control of all records, and in
equally full control of the minds of it’s members, it follows
that the past is whatever the party chooses to make it. Six
means eighteen, two plus two equals five, war is peace,
freedom is slavery, ignorance is strength.”

“If the party could thrust its hand into the past and say
of this and that event, it never happened–that, surely,
was more terrifying than mere torture and death.”

“the Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today’s issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston’s job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones.”

“As soon as all the corrections which happened to be necessary in any partiucular number of the Times had been assembled and collated, that number would be reprinted, the original copy destroyed, and the corrected copy placed on the files in it’s stead. This process of continuation alteration was applied not only to newspapers, but to books, periodicals, pamphlets, posters, leaflets, films, sound tracks, cartoons, photographs–to every kind of literature or documentation which might conceivably hold any political or ideological significance. Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. In this way every prediction made by the Party could be shown by documentary evidence to be correct; nor was any item of news, or expression of opinion, which conflicted with the needs of the moment, ever allowed to be on record.”

“We control life, Winston, at all its levels. You are imagining that there is something called human nature which will be outraged by what we do and will turn against us. But we create human nature. Men are infinitely malleable.”

Thank God for the life of George Orwell.