Georgia and Michigan received “F” in 2012 on anti corruption measures, GA SOS Brian Kemp, 650+ govt employees received gifts from vendors in 2007 – 2008

Georgia and Michigan received “F” in 2012 on anti corruption measures, GA SOS Brian Kemp, 650+ govt employees received gifts from vendors in 2007 – 2008

“we did have a problem with one of the vote scanners.”…Tom Rees, chairman of Floyd County’s Board of Elections

“We discovered that these systems are subject to different types of unauthorized manipulation and potential fraud,”  “There is a reason that Texas rejected it,”...Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton

”They’ve got to be outcome determinative, but I will tell you, the Lt. Gov. [Geoff Duncan] in Georgia, the Secretary of State in Georgia [Brad Raffensperger] in Georgia, they’re in for quite a shock on Monday and Tuesday about how poorly they run and they ran – there’s going to be a proof – of how poorly run they ran the elections in one of their major counties,”…Attorney Jordan Sekulow

 

From Citizen Wells March 19, 2012.

“We already knew that Georgia is a corrupt state. We learned this during the recent handling of the Obama ballot challenges in GA by the behaviour of the Secretary of State, other election officials and the GA courts. We now have independent confirmation from a recent study of state ethics, open records and disclosure laws.

From State Integrity Investigation.

“The tales are sadly familiar to even the most casual observer of state politics.

In Georgia, more than 650 government employees accepted gifts from vendors doing business with the state in 2007 and 2008, clearly violating state ethics law. The last time the state issued a penalty on a vendor was 1999.”
“The stories go on and on. Open records laws with hundreds of exemptions. Crucial budgeting decisions made behind closed doors by a handful of power brokers. “Citizen” lawmakers voting on bills that would benefit them directly. Scores of legislators turning into lobbyists seemingly overnight. Disclosure laws without much disclosure. Ethics panels that haven’t met in years.

State officials make lofty promises when it comes to ethics in government. They tout the transparency of legislative processes, accessibility of records, and the openness of public meetings. But these efforts often fall short of providing any real transparency or legitimate hope of rooting out corruption.

That’s the depressing bottom line that emerges from the State Integrity Investigation, a first-of-its-kind, data-driven assessment of transparency, accountability and anti-corruption mechanisms in all 50 states. Not a single state — not one — earned an A grade from the months-long probe. Only five states earned a B grade: New Jersey, Connecticut, Washington, California, and Nebraska. Nineteen states got C’s and 18 received D’s. Eight states earned failing grades of 59 or below from the project, which is a collaboration of the Center for Public Integrity, Global Integrity, and Public Radio International.

The F’s went to Michigan, North Dakota, South Carolina, Maine, Virginia, Wyoming, South Dakota, and Georgia.

What’s behind the dismal grades? Across the board, state ethics, open records and disclosure laws lack one key feature: teeth.

“It’s a terrible problem,” said Tim Potts, executive director of the nonprofit advocacy group Democracy Rising PA, which works to inspire citizen trust in government. “A good law isn’t worth anything if it’s not enforced.””

“Using a combination of on-the-ground investigative reporting and original data collection and analysis, the State Integrity Index researched 330 “Integrity Indicators” across 14 categories of state government: public access to information, political financing, executive accountability, legislative accountability, judicial accountability, state budget processes, civil service management, procurement, internal auditing, lobbying disclosure, pension fund management, ethics enforcement, insurance commissions, and redistricting.

Indicators assess what laws, if any, are on the books (“in law” indicator) and whether the laws are effective in practice (“in practice” indicators). In many states, the disconnect between scores on a state’s law and scores in practice suggest a serious “enforcement gap.”

In other words, the laws are there, just not always followed.”
“While there are many examples that highlight a lack of resources, others assert that political factors may also be at play.

Georgia’s legislature slashed the ethics commission’s budget, eliminating all investigative positions and eventually forcing out its two top staffers. The former executive director claimed the funding cuts came with ulterior motives; at the time, the agency was pursuing an investigation against Governor Nathan Deal for improper use of campaign funds and exceeding campaign finance limits. Deal said the cuts were in line with what happened to other agencies. The state’s inspector general followed with an investigation, but found no evidence to support the claim of the commission’s former executive director.

Political loyalties can be a potential problem, especially since many ethics agencies are staffed by gubernatorial or legislative appointments.”

“For state judges, it’s a similar situation. Nearly all states have rules, codes, or regulations outlining recusal requirements, but again they leave it up to the judges to decide their own impartiality.

“There’s a longstanding principal that no judge should be the judge in his or her own case,” said Charlie Hall, director of communications for Justice at Stake, a national organization that promotes a fair and impartial court system. “There’s a strong sense by many that if one party asks a judge to step aside, there’s something not satisfying by the judge saying, ‘I think I can be impartial. I can make the decision.’”

Nine states don’t require judges to disclose outside assets, making it almost impossible to determine if a judge has a conflict at all. And in states where judges run for election, the potential for conflicts to arise is even greater.

“Special interests have discovered judicial elections and the money is pouring in,” Hall said.

Spending on judicial elections more than doubled in the past 20 years. From 2000 to 2009, special interests funneled about $206 million into court elections, up from about $83 million in the previous decade.””

https://citizenwells.com/2012/03/19/georgia-gets-f-on-anti-corruption-measures-ga-courts-prove-corrupt-in-obama-ballot-challenges-state-integrity-investigation-ethics-open-records-and-disclosure-laws/

 

More here:

https://citizenwells.com/

http://citizenwells.net/

 

 

3 responses to “Georgia and Michigan received “F” in 2012 on anti corruption measures, GA SOS Brian Kemp, 650+ govt employees received gifts from vendors in 2007 – 2008

  1. “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”…Edmund Burke

  2. I think we need three states. Maybe i’m wrong on that. But one state is not going to get the job done. Ted Cruz is demanding that the Supreme court here the Pa case. If they overturn the Pa supreme court, that’s only one state. I read someplace that overturning what the Pa supreme court did will have ramifications for other states. I don’t know if that is true or not.

    I don’t think the Supreme court is going to take multiple cases and overturn lower courts in several states.

    It looks to me like the Supreme court is going to have to decertify the election somehow to send the vote to the House of Reps. We can’t count on multiple state’s legislators doing their job and upending it at the state level. Based on the history of the republican party, there is no chance of that.

    Will the Supreme court decertify the election and send it to the House? We’ll see. If they don’t, i’m in favor of the next four years being the mother of all resistance.

  3. AND,
    ……….if crooked judges are allowed to prevail we will lose our freedom, and our country. Criminals are always quick to attempt to subvert sitting judges. If a judge even says “hello” to someone it can be seen as a conflict of interest.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s