Tag Archives: Lest we forget

Gettysberg Address, Abraham Lincoln, Civil War, Memorial Day, Lest we forget, Open Thread

Gettysberg Address, Abraham Lincoln, Civil War, Memorial Day

“We the people are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts, not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution.”…Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysberg Address

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Memorial day weekend, Lest we forget, Citizen Wells open thread, May 30, 2010

Memorial day weekend, Lest we forget, Citizen Wells open thread

I know more about ancestral participation in the American revolution than I do of the Civil War. However, I discovered the obituary of an ancestor several years ago. There is mention of his wound and battles. Since Memorial Day has roots in commemorating civil war soldiers, I share his obituary.

David Wells

“Death:   Oct. 11, 1914
American Fork
Utah County
Utah, USA
 
He was the son of Robert H. Wells & Lucinda Ann Gladden Wells. He married Susan Gordon January 5, 1866.
His obituary reads:
Old Canyon Character Goes to Reward-
David Wells, for twelve years Toll Gate Keeper at Mouth of American Fork Canyon, Died Sunday, Buried Tuesday.
David Wells died Sunday at 1 o’clock at the home of his son, Boyce Wells, He has been a sufferer for several years from chronic bronchitis.
Mr. Wells was born in Lincoln, North Carolina, June 10, 1844. He joined the Mormon church in 1883 and came west 31 years ago, locating in Manassa, Colorado. Ten years later he came to American Fork.
He was an old Confederate soldier and was wounded at the battle of Richmond and again at Petersburg. From the injury in the leg from a “minning ball” he never recovered. He was twelve years toll gate keeper at the mouth of American Fork canyon and was noted for his honesty and integrity. His wife, who was Miss Susan Gordon, died three years age. He leaves a son John, still in North Carolina. His other children Frances Wells, Boyce Wells, Mrs. Sarah Anderson and Mrs. Gertrude Brown all live in American Fork.
The funeral was held Tuesday in the Third Ward Meeting House. Bishop J.R. Hindley presided. The other speakers were Henry Miller, M.H. Fitzgerald and president Stephen L. Chipman. The ward choir supplied the music.
 
Burial:
American Fork Cemetery
American Fork
Utah County
Utah, USA ”

God bless all.

Memorial day history, May 29, 2010, Citizen Wells open thread, Lest we forget

Memorial day history, May 29, 2010

“We the people are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts, not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution.”…Abraham Lincoln

 

Memorial Day History

“Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s service. There are many stories as to its actual beginnings, with over two dozen cities and towns laying claim to being the birthplace of Memorial Day. There is also evidence that organized women’s groups in the South were decorating graves before the end of the Civil War: a hymn published in 1867, “Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping” by Nella L. Sweet carried the dedication “To The Ladies of the South who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead” (Source: Duke University’s Historic American Sheet Music, 1850-1920). While Waterloo N.Y. was officially declared the birthplace of Memorial Day by President Lyndon Johnson in May 1966, it’s difficult to prove conclusively the origins of the day. It is more likely that it had many separate beginnings; each of those towns and every planned or spontaneous gathering of people to honor the war dead in the 1860’s tapped into the general human need to honor our dead, each contributed honorably to the growing movement that culminated in Gen Logan giving his official proclamation in 1868. It is not important who was the very first, what is important is that Memorial Day was established. Memorial Day is not about division. It is about reconciliation; it is about coming together to honor those who gave their all.
 

 
Memorial Day was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11, and was first observed on 30 May 1868, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war). It is now celebrated in almost every State on the last Monday in May (passed by Congress with the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90 – 363) to ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays), though several southern states have an additional separate day for honoring the Confederate war dead: January 19 in Texas, April 26 in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi; May 10 in South Carolina; and June 3 (Jefferson Davis’ birthday) in Louisiana and Tennessee.”

Read more:

http://www.usmemorialday.org/backgrnd.html

General Seth Pomeroy, American Revolution, Patriots, They fought and died for our chance to save this country, Lest we forget

General Seth Pomeroy, American Revolution, Patriots

One of the things that keeps me going when I am tired or discouraged is the memory of all those who sacrificed, suffered and died to give us the privilege to defend and save this country.

From a comment placed on this blog a few minutes ago by commenter Mia.

“CW — I know you’ve already posted a new thread, but I hope you still see this. I wanted to thank you for this tribute to Bunker Hill. My great(x7)-grandfather fought at Bunker Hill. I thought you might appreciate this quote from him re the Revolution: “I go cheerfully, for I am sure the cause we are engaged in is just and the call I have to it is clear and the call of God.” He wrote this in his last letter to his wife. He died about a week later (illness) while preparing for battle with the English in Peekskill, NY. By the time of the Revolution, he was past the age of service, but volunteered nevertheless. And tho he was a commissioned officer, he was also very humble and fought as infantry, rather than step on anyone’s toes. He’s not well known now, but was considered quite the hero then. There is a monument to the Pomeroy family in his hometown of Northampton, MA (http://www.americanpomeroys.org/Northampton.html), and one honoring him in Peekskill (http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?_r=1&res=9D03E3DA1738E433A2575BC1A9609C94699ED7CF).

Hope you find this interesting, and maybe even a little bit inspiring. And as always, thank you for all you do.”

“The Northampton, MA Pomeroy Anvil Monument

The Northampton Monument commemorates Eltweed Pomeroy’s son Medad and his descendants who settled in Northampton MA in the 1660s. The monument also pays tribute to brothers General Seth Pomeroy and Lieutenant Daniel Pomeroy.Front InscriptionIn 1660 Medad Pomeroy accepted an offer of tools, an anvil shaped like
this replica, and land in exchange for opening a blacksmith shop in
Northampton. That anvil was passed through many generations
of Pomeroy blacksmiths becoming a symbol of the family.His grandson, General Seth Pomeroy, was one of many
Pomeroy gunsmiths and blacksmiths in Northampton.
A patriot and father of nine, Seth served in the
Massachusetts militia and saw action as a Major
at Louisbourg in 1745 and as Lt. Col. at the Battle
of Lake George, NY in 1755. In that battle, which
started as the Bloody Morning Scout, his brother
Lt. Daniel Pomeroy and many other sons of
Northampton were lost.

At age 69 in 1775, Seth fought at Bunker Hill.
George Washington then offered him the
commission of Brigadier-General which he declined
due to his age. He died of pleurisy in Peekskill, NY
in 1777 while on a march with his militia unit
to join General Washington in Morristown, NJ.”

http://www.americanpomeroys.org/Northampton.html