McLain Farlow obituary, Stormed Normandy Beach with 1st Battalion Big Red One June 6, 1944, Mr. Farlow lived to be a 100 years old, His memorial fitting for Memorial Day 2016

McLain Farlow obituary, Stormed Normandy Beach with 1st Battalion Big Red One June 6, 1944, Mr. Farlow lived to be a 100 years old, His memorial fitting for Memorial Day 2016

“But they that wait on the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint”….Isaiah 40:31

“If you will not fight for right when you can easily win without bloodshed,
If you will not fight when your victory is sure and not too costly,
You may come to the moment when you will have to fight
with all the odds against you and only a precarious chance of survival.”…Winston Churchill

“God I love that generation, World War II, “The greatest generation.”
They are passing at an alarming rate and creating an increasing vacuum of integrity and accountability.
Will it be filled?
Can it be filled?”…Citizen Wells

What a fitting memorial for Memorial Day 2016.

From the Greensboro News Record May 30, 2016.

“Percy McLain Farlow was born March 22, 1916 to Percy and Marjorie Cannon Farlow. He was the oldest of nine children. McLain, in his own words said “I walked to Marlboro school with Marshall, Philip, Theron and Nancy. Along the way, several others joined us as we passed their house. It took about 45 minutes because we did not cut through the woods.” He graduated in 1934 from Randleman High School and during those years, he courted Vadalia Marriage Farlow. After graduation, she went onto High Point College and McLain went to live and work on a neighboring farm. The family also provided transportation to him so that he could work at Melrose Hosiery Mill in High Point. After Vadalia’s graduation, they married on June 11, 1941 and headed to Baltimore to work in the Glenn L. Martin Aircraft factory. Two years later in September of 1943, McLain was drafted in the U.S. Army at the age of 27. He began his training at Camp Wheeler in Macon, Georgia and continued his training in South Hampton, England. On June 6, 1944, D-Day, he traveled by boat across the English Channel to France as part of the 1st Battalion, known as the Big Red One. There, his troop was met with raining bullets and though he didn’t talk about the war very much, he would often tell us about the French running across his back while hiding in a ditch. He had a few other favorite stories and we all grew to know what World War II meant to him and we appreciated his time of service. He was later assigned to the Military Post Office and was Honorably Discharged from the Army in 1946. Returning home, he surprised Vadalia by walking upstairs and saying ‘Hello!’ He had ridden a bus to High Point and took a taxi to Sophia to get home. They quickly began their family and raised four daughters, Elizabeth Ann, Amelia, Elaine, and Beverly, on the family farm, all while tending to Vadalia’s parents. McLain was a farmer at heart and returned to that love by tending to a farm of chickens, cows and pigs. He made a weekly egg delivery to the Emerywood area in High Point and to local families each Friday. The girls remember making this trip with him several times, creating lasting memories. McLain also enjoyed being involved in his community and church. He was a birthright member of the Marlboro Friends Meeting and served on the Cemetery Committee. He was also on the Board of Directors for Randolph County Farm Bureau and worked the polls during election time. He was a favorite customer at Food Lion and was invited to cut the ribbon at the Ribbon Ceremony for the opening of the Randleman Food Lion.Later in McLain’s farming career, he hauled cattle for a local cattleman. He enjoyed going to the cow sales and watching the buying and selling. He later leased his farm and was often seen on his Case tractor, checking fences and bush-hogging. He took great pride in maintaining his barns and pastures and for relaxation, he would fish and bird hunt with his favorite dog, Badeye.In McLain’s later years in life, he found enjoyment in reading. At breakfast each morning he read at least three newspapers and was always seen sitting in his chair with a book. The Randolph County Public Library Extension Service visited him each month and brought him a tote of books which he read cover to cover. For birthdays and special occasions, he loved getting lottery scratch-offs and reading the many cards that would come in the mail to him.The grandchildren have many stories about all the chauffeuring he did and on some mornings he dropped girls off at New Market, Randleman Middle and Randleman High only to pick them up seven hours later. There was dance practice, ball practice and always a stop at Farlow Oil. McLain was very giving and loving of his time and taught all of his “children” to enjoy the simple things in life. For Christmas he gave each grandchild and great grandchild a $2 bill. He always signed the card with ‘Merry Christmas, Granddaddy’. He was a man of few words, but with very strong values that he instilled in each member of his family. His advice was like none other and his life motto was “you can’t change the situation so you might as well accept it.”At age 100, McLain very peacefully took his last breath on Saturday afternoon, May 28, 2016. He is pre-deceased by his wife of forty-seven years, Vadalia Farlow; daughters Elizabeth Ann Rich and Elaine Smalley; son-in-law Michael Hilliard; granddaughter, Betsy D. Haynes. He is survived by daughters, Beverly Hilliard, Amelia Davis and husband Keith, son-in-law Larry Rich; eleven grandchildren: Eric Rich and Bia, Bryan Rich and Laurie, Cynthia Strider and Keith, Gayle Robertson and Marshall, Philip Davis and Sonja, Anna Buti and Tim, Autumn O’Malley and Tom, Brooke Farlow, Megan Hallett and David, Leah Redding and Greg, Mollie Hopkins and Jeff; twenty-three great-grandchildren, three great-great-grandchildren; brothers Curtis Farlow and Becky, Theron Farlow and Eloise, and sister Jane Myers. To celebrate McLain’s life, a visitation will be held on Wednesday, June 1st from 3 to 4 p.m. at Marlboro Friends followed by a funeral service at 4 p.m. and burial. Pall bearers are Bryan Rich, Eric Rich, Philip Davis, Keith Strider, Marshall Robertson, Steven Haynes, David Hallett, Greg Redding, and Jeff Hopkins. Pugh Funeral Home of Randleman is assisting the family. Online condolences may be made to the family at: www:pughfuneralhome.com.

http://www.greensboro.com/obituaries/farlow-mclain/article_58db1e48-e1be-5f2d-881a-600e68ac85da.html

God bless McLain Farlow and his family.

 

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3 responses to “McLain Farlow obituary, Stormed Normandy Beach with 1st Battalion Big Red One June 6, 1944, Mr. Farlow lived to be a 100 years old, His memorial fitting for Memorial Day 2016

  1. citizenwells

    “But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

    Abraham Lincoln, “The Gettysburg Address.”

  2. citizenwells

    Follow this horse crap logic…..

    “As we honor our nation’s military this Memorial Day, consider this: Military spouses face a staggering 18% unemployment rate compared with a national unemployment rate of 4.4% for a similar cohort of young married women. More than half of those military spouses who do work face crippling underemployment: They are six times more likely to earn salaries below their education and experience level. Like Amanda, I personally know this struggle well. As a military spouse, I had years I earned less than a tenth of my previous salary.”

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/when-military-spouses-cant-find-jobs-it-costs-the-economy-1-billion-2016-05-27

    Obviously the real unemployment rate in the US is closer to the 18%.

  3. Rest in peace Mr. Farlow. You served your family and your country well.

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